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Tag Archives: trash

Environmental-photographer7

by Alex Marttunen, Environmental Photographer of the Year 2010 (EPOTY) award winner

 

by Andrew McCornell from his “Rubbish Dump 2.0” project

“The suburb of Agbogbloshie in Ghana’s capital, Accra, has in recent years become a dumping ground for computers and electronic waste from Europe and the US. Hundreds of tons of e-waste end up here every month as countries in the West attempt to unload their ever increasing stockpiles of toxic junk. Of the 20 to 50 million tons of electronics discarded each year 70% will end up in poor nations, and in the EU alone 6.6 million tons of e-waste are unaccounted for every year.
Increasingly this e-waste is findeng it’s way to West Africa and countries like Ghana, Nigeria and Ivory Coast. Traders bypass international laws by labeling the equipment as second-hand goods or charity donations, but, in reality as much as 80% of the computers sent to Ghana are broken or obsolete. their final resting place is Agbogbloshie dump where they are broken apart, mostly by children, to salvage the copper, hard drives and other components that can be sold on.
The disposal of electronic goods in the West is a costly affair and must be done in an environmentally responsible manner, however in places like Ghana there are no such regulations and as such toxic metals like lead, beryllium, cadmium and mercury are continiously being released causing untold damage to human health and the environment”.

– Andrew McCornell

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by Misty Keasler from her “Guatemala City Dump” project

“A friend told me about the Guatemala City Dump when he heard I was planning my trip. He said there were many people and children living inside the dump. I made a point to see the dump before returning to the states.
I returned the following December, expressly to spend photographing the dump. It ended up being the most difficult project I have ever worked on, both visually and emotionally.
The dump itself was visually challenging. The whole thing was horribly ugly.”

– Misty Keasler

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by Michael Trenerry from his project “Dundoras Dump”

“Dundoras Dump is located on the outskirts of Nairobi and is in the middle of several residential slum neighbourhoods. The area is divided into five phases. Phase One being the furthest from the dumpsite and Phase Five being next to the dump and the most dangerous.
The area is approximately two and a half square kilometers in size and is home to over 3000 jobs. The people working in the dumpsite do so by their own means. They claim areas and essentially spend their day sorting through either plastic, metal or any other recyclable materials. The health concerns are incredibly high with immense levels of methane in the air.
Children, women and men collect rubbish in their areas & theyn carry them to weight stations where they collect cash for their find in. Most are lucky to make a dollar or two per day.
When rubbish is dumped, intense odours spread through the tip alongside methane from the back of the truck. Most workers within the site have skin infections and once infected can easily lead to other diseases.
Sadly, this wasteland is home to many people. They work, eat and sleep within the dumpside”.

Michael Trenerry

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La botella by Rafael Millan.

by Rafael Millan

“This picture was taken earlier this year. The poor children are part of the Pemón indigenous tribe in Bolívar State, Venezuela.
I think the image explains very well the level of poverty of these children, but there’s also something very ironic about this photograph. At the top right corner you can see a blue bottle. To all Venezuelans it’s easily distinguishable because it’s a PDVSA oil bottle, it can be any of the many petroleum derivates sold in Venezuela by the state-owned oil company.
It seems that the only way these children can profit from all the wealth coming from the oil company is by receiving blue bottles of oil. However, all this money the state makes doesn’t seem to transform into education, health or proper homes”

– Rafael Millan