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from epSos.de flickr page

“Free, beautiful picture of waste pollution and trash disposal at the garbage beach of Malaysia.

The plastic bottles on this beach could be collected and send into recycling or waste management facility. The garbage on this beach alone is worth thousands of Euros. The pollution with trash comes to this beautiful Malaysian beach from the Chinese sea, where nature destruction is severe because water of rivers and the oceans is used for disposal of hazardous waste. The ocean becomes dirty and polluted.

Sand of the beaches becomes toxic as the bottles are melting in the heat of the sun. This rubbish is not collected by anyone.

Recycling or at least collecting of this trash from the beach would improve the environmental situation and help to ease the global ecological destruction of the limited environment that is disappearing from the map.

Climate change and water pollution are very visible on this Malaysian beach that suffered deforestation and hazardous pollutants which polluted and contaminated nature with plastic junk”

- Mehvan Kurdish

 

by Pierre Torset from his “Shipbreaking” project

“Shipbreaking is a controversial industry.

It used to be a highly mechanized operation, concentrated in industrialized countries. But in order to maximize profits, in the 80s ship owners began sending their vessels to the scrap yards of India (Alang), Pakistan or Bangladesh, where salary, health, safety and working standards are minimal, and workers are desperate for work”

- Pierre Torset

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by Ollie Woods from “Red star, black gold” project on lensculture

“I had come to a remote part of north eastern China to photograph one of the last working steam railways left in the world”

- Ollie Woods
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by Sergey Gorshkov from his blogpost

“Our fathers had been poisoned Arctic. In our best to leave it to our children a little bit cleaner”

- Sergey Gorshkov

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by Yann Gross from his “Agreste” project

“The story is taking place in the north-east brazilian countryside area.
This place has a remainder of the Mata Atlantica, which was once the second largest
forest of South America and which has only about 6% left of its original size.
The rivers taking their source in these wooded hills can supply water to the villages
nearby. However, deforestation is accelerating, and water begins to fail.
I was interested to talk about the everyday life of the people living there, small
stories which are taking place in this remote area”

- Yann Gross

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